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Around The Bend June 2016


Fort Bend Regional Council CEO Lisa Poynor addresses the dinner guests.

Fort Bend Regional Council CEO Lisa Poynor addresses the dinner guests.

FBRC--Cordes-Award-honoree-Charles-Dupre

Dr. Charles Dupre was the FBRC Cordes Award honoree .

FORT BEND REGIONAL COUNCIL ON SUBSTANCE ABUSE HELEN CORDES AWARD DINNER

A record-breaking Seventh Annual Cordes Award Dinner was held by Fort Bend Regional Council on Substance Abuse (FBRC) on Feb. 25 at the Stafford Centre. Event co-chairs were Roberta Avery and Dr. Betty Baitland. The 2016 honoree was Fort Bend I.S.D. Superintendent Dr. Charles Dupre. Two hundred and seventy attendees heard speaker Kevin Price share insights into the family disease of alcoholism and addiction. Yolanda Green served as the emcee. Haynes and Boone was presenting sponsor, along with 30 other local sponsors.

A highlight of the event was a special tribute to Helen Cordes, for whom the event was founded and the annual award is given. The award honors her generous community spirit and community achievements. Helen served on the Fort Bend Regional Council’s board of directors from 1991–1997 and as president from 1992–1995. During that time and long afterward, Helen served with such a sincere passion for FBRC’s mission that she has inspired all who have shared the privilege of working with her.

A video shown during the program that demonstrates the Council’s work may be viewed at vimeo.com/156856242

All funds raised benefit Fort Bend Regional Council’s programs for adults and youth who are impacted by alcohol and drug abuse. Proceeds are used to further efforts to restore families and break the cycle of addiction, as well as help students in Fort Bend County build coping skills so they won’t fall victim to substance abuse. In addition to outpatient treatment, FBRC reaches 10,000 students in 39 schools in Fort Bend, Lamar Consolidated and Stafford School Districts.  FBRC prepares children to make positive, healthy choices and successfully overcome life’s challenges.

To support FBRC’s programs or get involved with fundraising events, contact Director of Development Debbie Ortiz at 281-207-2406 or dortiz@fortbendcouncil.org.

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Storyteller Miriam Watson and her puppet are back-dropped by vintage Madame Alexander Little Women Dolls at the "Hello Dolly Tea Party."

Storyteller Miriam Watson and her puppet are back-dropped by vintage Madame Alexander Little Women Dolls at the “Hello Dolly Tea Party.”

“HELLO DOLLY TEA PARTY” AT HISTORIC DEW HOUSE

The “Hello Dolly Tea Party” held at the historic Dew House in April was a success as generations enjoyed tea and sandwiches with their favorite dolls. It was choreographed by docent Becky Gay among floral arrangements donated by Signature Floral Designs. Guests were also treated to the talents of storyteller Miriam Watson and an exhibit of some very special dolls owned and collected by the docents of Dew House.

Included in the exhibit was Gay’s china doll as well as a salesman sample iron stove from the early 1900s, a wooden rocker which was made for Gay’s grandfather in the late 1800s, and a cradle made for her aunt out of a metal container circa 1925. China dolls were produced from approximately the late 1830s through the early 1900’s (until about 1930) with the greatest number produced from the 1850s through the 1890s. China dolls generally only have heads made of glazed bisque with bodies usually made of cloth or leather, sometimes with glazed or unglazed lower arms and legs. Dew House Director Diane Ware brought the doll high chair that her father made her as well as a child-sized chair that belonged to her mother-in-law on which to display the wide array of vintage dolls.

In 1933, prompted by the release of the motion picture Little Women, doll maker Madame Alexander released her first line of Little Women Dolls, and to this day, these dolls are probably the most easily recognized in a long line of storybook dolls produced by this world-class doll maker. Beatrice Alexander lived above her father’s doll hospital, the first ever in the U.S., and started making her own cloth dolls during World War I to help his business. Some of her first creations were dolls representing popular characters. Jo, Meg, Beth, Amy and Marme attended the tea party courtesy of docent Lisa Glenn who received them as a little girl. Glenn said that her love of books started with Little Women.

Around 1951, McCall magazine featured a Betsy McCall one-dimensional paper cutout doll with fashions and a story line, which ran for 44 years. The Ideal Toy Company produced the first three-dimensional Betsy McCall doll. Docent Jo Butterfield loaned the Betsy McCall doll her grandmother made her as a child to the tea party exhibit. “Often,” Jo said, “there were doll clothes you could cut out of the magazine for your own paper Betsy McCall doll.” Butterfield also loaned her “Revlon” doll, introduced in late 1955, noting that everything the doll was wearing was original including the stockings with seams which were once considered high fashion. Butterfield said, “In many ways, she’s a pre-Barbie since she has an amazing figure.”

Watson’s lively storytelling enhanced the warm and nostalgic feelings evoked from experiencing a tea party in the company of all the wonderful dolls. “The art of storytelling became important to me at an early age. My love of telling stories was taken with me into the classroom as a young classroom teacher and to the library as a school librarian. It has followed me into retirement and is still one of the activities that is a defining art in my life,” said Watson as she enthralled the guests of the tea party. – Contributed by Lisa Glenn

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Athletes with The Arc of Fort Bend compete in the Special Olympics.

Athletes with The Arc of Fort Bend compete in the Special Olympics.

SUGAR PLUM MARKET HELPS THE ARC OF FORT BEND SEND ATH­LETES TO THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS

The Sugar Plum Market is racing ahead to its 2016 event. Since 2001, the holiday shopping extravaganza has raised over $1.9 million for numerous Fort Bend County nonprofit organizations. Previous grants have contributed to educational programs, food pan­tries, assistance for women and children, literacy programs, and many other charitable needs. The 16th Annual Market, presented by the Fort Bend Junior Service League (FBJSL) and Memorial Hermann, will focus this year’s “Making Spirits Bright” theme on the organizations that have benefited from these grants through the years.

One of those nonprofits is The Arc of Fort Bend. Founded in 1968, the mission of The Arc is to provide opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to improve their quality of life. The agency is a strong advocate for these individuals, while offering recreational and social programs, employment assistance, and housing support. The Arc also boasts the largest Special Olympics program in the area. Funds from prior Sugar Plum Market events have afforded many athletes the opportunity to compete in the Special Olympics and other area tournaments.

The 2016 Sugar Plum Market will once again benefit several Fort Bend County charities. Doors will open at the Stafford Centre for a special Preview Night shopping event on Thursday, Nov. 3 from 6-10 p.m. General hours will be on Friday, Nov. 4 from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 5 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Tickets for Friday or Saturday are $12 each. Preview Night tickets (limited quantity available) are $75 each and include advance shopping Thursday night, a Preview Night drink ticket, light hors d’oeuvres, and Market entry Friday and Saturday. Tickets may be purchased at sugarplummarket.com beginning Sept. 1. For more information, visit the website or email
information@sugarplummarket.com.

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Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Clubs sponsored The 51st Annual Crime Prevention luncheon honoring outstanding peace officers in the Houston area.

Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Clubs sponsored The 51st Annual Crime Prevention luncheon honoring outstanding peace officers in the Houston area.

TLGCD EXCHANGE CLUBS CRIME PREVENTION LUNCHEON

The National Exchange Club Covenant of Service states: “To honor and respect law, to serve my fellowmen, and to uphold the ideals and institutions of my Country.” Exchangites from the Texas Louisiana Gulf Coast District Exchange Clubs did just that for the 51st time at a luncheon held at City Centre at Quail Valley on April 14.

The officers were nominated by their captains, who presented them to the attendees and told stories of their heroic service. Each peace officer received a plaque and gift from club president Mike Reichek.

The honorees were Detective Corporal Arminda Cantu, Angleton PD; Deputy Jason Ringo, Brazoria Sheriff’s Office; Detective Scott Minyard, FBC Sheriff’s Office; Officer Carlos Granillo, Friendswood PD; Deputy Paul Brown and Deputy Ed Aldridge, Harris County Sheriff’s Office; Deputy Franklin Salas, Harris County Constable; Officer James Garris, Houston PD; Senior Police Officer James Thomas, Houston PD-Air Support Division; Officer James Pavlock, Memorial Villages PD; Detective Brad Tippit and Detective Andy Robb, Missouri City PD; Detective John DeSpain, Pearland PD; Officer Chad Petty, Richmond PD; Sergeant Brandon Moseley, Rosenberg PD and Officer Tuan-Huy Tran, Sugar Land PD.

For more information about local Exchange Clubs, visit tlgcd.org or nationalexchangeclub.org.

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2015 Tournament Winners "Frickin’ Fishin’."

2015 Tournament Winners “Frickin’ Fishin’.”

FORT BEND COUNTY FAIR BOOTS & BUCKLES FISHING TOURNAMENT

It was a rodeo on the water at the Fort Bend County Fair Association’s Third Annual Boots & Buckles on the Bay fishing tournament. Fishing teams competed for over $5,000 in cash and prizes, including trophy buckles on May 14 in Matagorda. The fishing tournament is one of several events that are held throughout the year to help bring awareness to the Fort Bend County Fair and raise scholarship funds.

Bragging rights at the 2015 tournament went to the four-member team, Frickin Fishin. The anglers won top honors and earned the Grand Champion title among 16 teams. The teams returned to battle to lay down the lines to catch redfish, trout and flounder. Randall Bryant, member of the 2015 Grand Champion team, had this to say about last year’s win: “It was pretty rough. The wind was blowing and we just stayed with it and ended up scratching out a good box of fish. It was a good time and for a good cause. Supporting the kids is always a good thing. Win or lose, it doesn’t matter.”

The event was sponsored by Todd Armstrong Shows, who has entertained the Fort Bend County Fair with his carnival for several decades. Armstrong has been a long-time supporter of the Fair and has sponsored the fishing tournament since the inaugural year.

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Volunteers of Oakbend Medical Center.

Volunteers of Oakbend Medical Center.

OAKBEND MEDICAL CENTER LUNCHEON HONORS VOLUNTEERS

The 58 volunteers of OakBend Medical Center were honored at a luncheon held at Safari Texas. This year the volunteers celebrate 56 years of service to OakBend Medi­cal Center. The volunteers provide much-needed help in numerous departments around the hospital. From escorting patients to their appointments to running two gift shops, the volunteers are one of the largest financial contributors to the hospital. Their fundraising efforts include bake sales, popcorn sales, craft shows and the gift shops.

President of the volunteer board, Victoria Bedo, presented a check for $30,000 to CEO Joe Freudenberger and VP/hospital administrator Sue McCarty. The money is dedicated to the Skilled Nursing Facility, the only hospital-based facility of its kind in Fort Bend County. Last year, the volunteers donated money to the Skilled Nursing Facil­ity, which was used to renovate the flooring in the unit. The volunteers attribute their fund­raising success to teamwork and support from the Hospital CEO, board of directors and the staff.

During 2015-2016, volunteers have given the hospital 12,633 hours of their time to make a difference at OakBend’s two locations. Broken down into eight-hour days, it is equivalent to 1,579 days; broken down by 365 days a year, it equates to four years and three months.

Each volunteer received a clock engraved with the words “Your Time is Priceless” as a keepsake. The luncheon also featured the in­stallation of the board of directors for the volunteers: Dawn Basden, pre­s­ident; Nancy Brown, vice president; Don­­­na Donahue, recording secretary; Janell Kucera, treasurer; and Cathy Olenick, historian.

According to Donna Ferguson, VP and COO of OakBend Medical Group and the volunteer liaison, “This is an amazing group of volunteers who give so freely of their time for the organization and the patients it serves. They are a true inspiration to volunteerism.”

“Our volunteers are the heart of our hospital,” said Joe Freudenberger. “Without their dedication and service, our lives would be much more difficult. We treasure this group of inspiring individuals.”

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The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 3903 presents a plaque of appreciation to Oakbend nurses.

The Ladies Auxiliary of VFW Post 3903 presents a plaque of appreciation to Oakbend nurses.

VFW LADIES AUXILIARY HOLDS NURSE APPRECIATION LUNCHEON FOR OAKBEND MEDICAL CENTER

On April 20, VFW Post 3903 Ladies Auxiliary held a Nurse Appreciation Lunch­eon for the nurses of OakBend Medical Center. The ladies auxiliary invited nurses from all of OakBend Medical Center’s campuses to come to the Jackson Street Campus to be served a hot lunch.

For the past six years, the Auxiliary has provided lunch and dessert for the nurses in the OakBend hospital system to show their appreciation for all that the nurses do every day. Each year, they get food donated for this appreciation event and the volunteers gladly come forward to setup, serve and thank the nurses. This year, the food was donated by Ben’s Chuck Wagon in Wallis. Ben Puste­jovsky has donated food for the past several years to help the Auxiliary say thank you to the nurses.

The Ladies Auxiliary awarded a plaque to the hospital which reads: “Appreciation Award, Oakbend Medical Nursing Staff for your continuing hard work and dedication to your community and patients. VFW Post 3903 Ladies Auxiliary, April 2016.”

“We are so honored to be recognized and thanked by these ladies each year,” said Sue McCarty, VP and Administrator of OakBend Medical Center. “They are so kind for taking the time to do this for our nurses and to personally come forward to serve and thank everyone that comes through the line. Our nurses greatly appreciate the recognition, the food and the well wishes.”

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2016 Sugar Plum Market Co-Chairs. (Front row, l-r): Alison Haralson, Sherri Ebarb, and Katie Harris; (back row): Monica Henderson and Danielle Hames.

2016 Sugar Plum Market Co-Chairs. (Front row, l-r): Alison Haralson, Sherri Ebarb, and Katie Harris; (back row): Monica Henderson and Danielle Hames.

SUGAR PLUM MARKET “MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT,” NOV. 3-5

“Making Spirits Bright” is the theme of the 2016 Sugar Plum Market, but it’s also what the Fort Bend Junior Service League (FBJSL) has been doing since its inception in 2001. Through funds raised at the holiday shopping event, the Sugar Plum Market has donated over $1.9 million to various Fort Bend County charities in grants that have and will continue to brighten the spirits of so many in need.

Presented by Memorial Hermann, the 16th annual market will take place at the Stafford Centre on Friday, Nov. 4 and Saturday, Nov. 5. Market hours will be from 9 a.m.-8 p.m. on Friday, and from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday. A special preview night shopping event will be held Thursday, Nov. 3 from 6 p.m.-10 p.m. Unique vendors from across Texas will offer a holiday shopping extravaganza.

General Admission tickets for Friday or Saturday are $12 each. A limited number of preview night tickets are available for $75 each and include advance shopping Thursday night, a preview night drink ticket, light hors d’oeuvres and market entry Friday and Saturday. Tickets may be purchased online beginning Sept. 1.

The Sugar Plum Market offers a variety of sponsorship and underwriting opportunities for both businesses and individuals. Spon­sors receive benefits including event signage, website and program recognition, plus preview night tickets with early sponsor entry. Preview night has consistently sold out each year

For more information, visit sugarplummarket.com or email information@sugarplummarket.com. Event photos and updates can be found on the Sugar Plum Market’s Facebook page.

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(L-R): Wen Wing, Cindy Cheng, Syndee Howgate, Terri Wang and Lisa Kulhanek.

(L-R): Wen Wing, Cindy Cheng, Syndee Howgate, Terri Wang and Lisa Kulhanek.

EDUCATION FOUNDATION HOSTS LUNCHEON FOR VOLUNTEERS

On April 26, the Fort Bend Education Foundation’s Angels of Education Auxiliary hosted a luncheon for volunteers. New Auxi­liary members were invited to hear about the Foundation’s programs and volunteer opportunities. Darling Homes graciously provided lunch and its model home in Sienna Plantation at Sawmill Lakes as the locale. The Angels of Education Auxiliary supports the Foundation by providing volunteers and creating community awareness.

The Foundation’s mission is to enrich and enhance the quality of education for all Fort Bend ISD students through its grant programs, which include Grants for Teachers and Schools, Professional Development Grants and New Teacher Gifts.

If you are interested in becoming a volunteer with the Fort Bend Education Foun­dation, visit fortbendisd.com/foundation

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Dr. Jeremy Goldbach gave a presentation focused on community-based solutions to reduce and prevent substance abuse.

Dr. Jeremy Goldbach gave a presentation focused on community-based solutions to reduce and prevent substance abuse.

FORT BEND DRUG SYMPOSIUM

The Fort Bend Drug Symposium convened a panel of national experts on April 20 at the Fort Bend ISD Annex. Speakers addressed prescription drugs, marijuana, synthetic drugs, and cutting edge prevention strategies.

Tom Gorman, director of the Rocky Moun­tain HIDTA of the White House Office of National Office on Drug Control Policy, presented on the impacts to public health and safety in Colorado since marijuana legalization. Dr. Susan Dalterio, professor at the University of Texas at San Antonio, spoke on the health and psychological effects of prescription drug misuse. Other topics included synthetic drug awareness, social norms about teen drug use and community solutions to the problem.

The half-day event was organized by the Fort Bend Community Prevention Coalition (FBCPC) and co-sponsored by the Houston High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA), Fort Bend Regional Council on Substance Abuse, and the Fort Bend Independent School District. Partners included: Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), Westpark Springs, Kemah Palms Recovery, Lifeway International, William H. Reading, M.D., Memorial Hermann PaRC, Fort Bend County Juvenile Probation Special Programs, Sugar Land Town Square, Sugar Land Skeeters, Minute Maid, Minuti Coffee, Papamex and Bush’s Chicken.

The Region 6 Prevention Resource Center reports that teen drug use is more prevalent in the region than state averages: 41percent of local teens have used marijuana by 12th grade and 24 percent have abused prescriptions. PRC 6 evaluator Emily Dean says, “The risk for addiction increases significantly when substance use begins in adolescence, from 1 in 10 among adults to 1 in 6 among teens.” Parental involvement and community awareness are key factors to prevention. Dean adds, “The symposium added a great source of information for parents and community leaders.”

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Teen Board members, (back row, l-r): Will Haase, Dylan Alexander, Naveen Jain; (front row): Gregory Freeman, Richard Freeman, Rachel Vanderzyl, Sydney Bynes, Rachel Wang, Audrey Vanderzyl, Jason Rodriguez, Blake Jameson and Kristen Li.

Teen Board members, (back row, l-r): Will Haase, Dylan Alexander, Naveen Jain; (front row): Gregory Freeman, Richard Freeman, Rachel Vanderzyl, Sydney Bynes, Rachel Wang, Audrey Vanderzyl, Jason Rodriguez, Blake Jameson and Kristen Li.

GRANT-A-STARR FOUNDATION FAMILY FUN RUN

On April 2, novice and experienced 5K runners, high school students and athletes, parents, children, and many more from Sugar Land and the greater Houston area came together to #RunLikeAStarr for the 8th Annual Grant-A-Starr Foundation Fun Run.

Grant Starr was just a little boy when he lost his life to an elusive and undefined virus. In loving memory of his life, over 500 participants came out on a bright and chilly morning to pack the racecourse start line on Uni­ver­sity Boulevard.

Checks in the amount of $25,000 were presented to both Texas Children’s Hospital and Children’s Memorial Hermann Hospital respectively. One hundred percent of the funds raised support projects dedicated to the development of rapid diagnostic testing.

A unique component of the event is that it is managed and operated by a Teen Board comprised of Fort Bend area high school students. The Foundation was particularly proud of the leadership demonstrated by Dylan Alexander, a senior at Clements High School. Through his efforts, supported by the strong and dedicated Teen Board of Directors, over $40,000 was raised to support the cause. This year was special, as it would have been Grant’s senior year in high school and many teens that worked on the event were his classmates.

Sugar Land City Councilman Joe Zimmer­man was the emcee and in attendance to support the efforts of the Foundation and the Teen Board.

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Ken Kosub of Limelight Films (left) with YIP participants and one of their projects with Child Advocates of Fort Bend board member Vickie Looney (standing at left).

Ken Kosub of Limelight Films (left) with YIP participants and one of their projects with Child Advocates of Fort Bend board member Vickie Looney (standing at left).

CHILD ADVOCATES OF FORT BEND EARNS AWARD FOR YOUTH IN PHILANTHROPY PROGRAM

Child Advocates of Fort Bend earned a $1,500 Leadership of Excellence Award from The George Foundation for the ageny’s participation and involvement with the Youth in Philan­thropy (YIP) Program. The Award was given at the recent Investment in Youth Luncheon. The 2016 YIP program enabled 151 junior and senior high school students from 18 schools in Fort Bend County to learn the role that volunteering and philanthropy play in building a better community for all.

YIP teams implement volunteer projects with the assistance of local nonprofit organizations, allowing students to discover the important role that the nonprofit sector plays in the community. The partnership between YIP teams and the nonprofit sector also allows students to enter into the philanthropic mode by measuring their new knowledge and experience in volunteering to determine grant awards to be presented to participating nonprofits at the completion of the program. YIP has been in existence since 1997 and has been a community partnership with the Fort Bend Chamber of Commerce, Fort Bend County school districts, local businesses and the community-at-large.


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